5 Surprising Signs Of A Disengaged Employee (Infographic)

By David Mizne

I love the definition of employee engagement that I read in this recent TalentCulture post. It’s succinct and comprehensive:  

When employees are engaged, they adopt the vision, values, and purpose of the organization they work for. They become passionate contributors, innovating problem solvers, and stunning colleagues. 

But what does it mean to be a disengaged employee? Well, according to that same post, disengaged employees are “not poised to put in extra effort for success. They don’t like going to work most days. They’re unlikely to recommend the products of, or employment with, their employer.”

Laziness, apathy, and dissidence are merely symptoms of bigger problems. And by the time many of those symptoms surface, remediation might be impossible.

Update: Check out the infographic below for more insights into the causes of disengagement and how you can motivate your employees to be more engaged. 

2 Types of Disengagement

According to Gallup, employee engagement isn’t binary. There are actually three classifications; engaged, not engaged, and actively disengaged. Engaged employees are easy to spot as are the miserable, dissident, counter-culture folks who are actively disengaged.  The silent majority who are not engaged make up over 50% of the American workforce, and are adept at blending in with the rest of the herd.

Sure some things are obvious – absenteeism, low energy, bad attitude, frequent use of social media, lack of enthusiasm…but few disengaged employees start out by staging a coup from their cubicle.  What are the early signs of employee disengagement?

1) No Initiative

Poor work product is a reliable barometer for disengagement, but good work might be a red herring. An employee may feel disconnected from your organization but might still perform because of a personal work ethic. Or maybe their job is too easy and they are not being challenged. Don’t be fooled that everything is okay simply because the person is producing. In fact, the lack of challenge that manifests as quality work may be what is behind the disengagement.

Instead, look how motivated the person is in a different context. Stage a voluntary hack-day for the company. Make it fun and offer great prizes. Does your top performer choose to not participate? If there are no other matters taking up their time, you may have a disengaged employee.

2) Unhealthy Activities

How often does an employee go to the break room for a coffee or snack? How often do they head out for a cigarette? Of course your employee may just be hungry, tired, or addicted to nicotine, but sometimes people over-indulge in unhealthy behaviors to fill a void in their personal or professional lives. People who are truly motivated by purpose often derive fulfillment simply by working diligently at their desks. They may even have to be reminded by a grumbling belly that they haven’t eaten lunch yet.

3) Silence

Ok maybe you just have an introvert on your hands. Some people feel their batteries recharge when they have their own space. But when the entire company or specific teams are experiencing a win and a select few show no excitement or celebration, that’s an engagement issue. 

4) Lack of Learning

When is the last time that quiet employee shared an article of interest about your company, marketplace trends, or interesting research dealing with their role? When is the last time they shared anything at all? Curiosity is a good sign that an employee cares about the bigger picture. They want to learn and grow in their role and share that with others. When you encourage learning and growth as a company value and employees don’t share your enthusiasm, it’s time to take a closer look. 

5) Wasted Weekends

When we aren’t happy or we’re uninspired at work, those emotions have a way of infiltrating all aspects of our lives. Are people spending their weekends sleeping most of the time, or are they pursuing a personal passion?

Winning at Work

I like to think of work as a game. As a player, I need to know the rules of how to play and how to win. These are set out via clear goals and objectives from management. I want teammates (employees) and fans (customers) who are loyal and energetic. Lastly I have to love the game and care about the outcome of playing it.

Problems begin when people don’t have clear direction from leadership. They are not placed in roles that are aligned with their strengths or where the outcomes of work feeds their souls. According to Forbes, employees like to use their strengths. A strong defensive player shouldn’t be thrown onto the court as a power-forward, and a creative contributor should not be head of sales. 

Another major deterrent to engagement is when the company either lacks values and purpose, or those phrases have just been written down somewhere and are no longer alive in the organization. Leaders at work are like coaches. Their job is to inspire everyone to win, to achieve the larger purpose. 

Want to know how to improve employee engagement? See what the 7 most fascinating employee engagement trends for 2016 are.

The Missing Piece for Disengaged Employees

Google the words “employee engagement” and you will see no shortage of articles explaining why disengagement happens and what you can do about it. Most place the responsibility firmly in the hands of leadership. They suggest defining the company purpose and values, acknowledging employee triumphs, creating clear goals and objectives, and most importantly creating a culture where open communication is valued.

Managers must ask questions so that they can find out what employees want – from their jobs or in their personal lives. This can be as simple as a new stapler, or as complex as creating a telework situation so that someone can finish their degree or start a family.

Great managers also ask employees to share their ideas. And when those ideas are implemented, they share the employee’s triumphs with the whole team or company. They let everyone see the difference that was made.

In workplaces that value open communication, especially between employees and their managers, issues and frustrations quickly surface. Instead of festering and eventually leading to disengagement, managers can offer support. Employees are more likely to trust leadership, building relationships where people are more forthcoming and willing to ask for help.

Disengagement may be an epidemic in the American workplace, but communication is the antidote. When it comes down to it, many of us are willing to let down a boss who is a stranger at a company where we are just pawns in their game. But how many of us are willing to let down the people we care about, when we are trusted equals in an enterprise where outcomes truly matter?

Want to learn more about why your employees are disengaged & how to motivate them? Check out this infographic from our friends at Company Folders, or read their expanded article here.

Employee Engagement In The Workplace
The infographic by Company Folders, Inc. is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

 

 



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  • patrick

    Good article. Agree with Work is a game and the winning

Employee Engagement

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